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8 Vegan Brunches That Prove the Meal Isn’t All About Eggs

Brunch may be synonymous with eggs, bacon, and buttery hollandaise sauce, but sometimes it’s nice to enjoy a brunch

entrée that doesn’t make you want to lie down afterward. These vegan brunch options are lighter twists on classic brunch dishes, but still make your Saturday meal feel pretty indulgent.

Let’s be honest. You can’t go to any brunch spot without seeing some kind of avocado toast on the menu. And vegans and meat eaters love it equally. This version stands out because it’s topped with three simple ingredients: crunchy radishes, lime juice, and poppy seeds. 

Gluten-free? Check. Dairy-free? Check. Egg-free? Check. Good-looking, great-tasting doughnuts? Check. Now all vegans can have their doughnuts… and eat them too.

Here’s a little secret: You can eat quinoa for breakfast. And another secret: Caramelized fruit tastes like candy without all of the added sugar. This recipe combines already sweet peaches with some maple syrup, cinnamon, and a touch of lemon juice. After eating this vegan breakfast bowl, you’ll never want boring old oatmeal again.

Most vegans swear that tempeh bacon tastes just like the real thing. Made by marinating and cooking thinly sliced tempeh strips in maple syrup, smoked paprika, chipotle powder, and cumin, tempeh bacon already sounds so delicious that you probably won’t even care if it tastes like bacon. Thrown on sweet potato hash, this is the heartiest vegan brunch option on the menu.

Sometimes brunch happens at 2 p.m., and your taste for breakfast has long passed. Welcome, vegan cauliflower tacos! This recipe takes gluten-free and vegan cauliflower rice and subs it for ground meat in a delicious vegan taco made for your weekend brunch.

Brunch really isn’t complete without some form of pancakes, but a traditional short stack is made with milk and eggs. Luckily, it’s pretty easy to make vegan pancakes with soy milk and chia seeds. Plus, this recipe is topped with two of the all-time best vegan ingredients—a mixture of maple syrup and peanut butter. 

No vegan brunch would be complete without some form of chia pudding. Not only are they a nutritional powerhouse, but when combined with nondairy milk, chia seeds quickly expand and form a pudding-like consistency. You can top your chia seed pudding with almost any combo of fruit and nuts, and you can get really crazy and try making it with different flavored milks.

Crumbled tofu has the same look and texture of scrambled eggs, but the taste isn’t always the same. This recipe rectifies that problem with the addition of black salt, which has a sulfuric eggy smell and taste. We know, mind blown. Add it to the same pan as veggies and spices, and you have a traditional savory scramble, made vegan.

 

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A Science-Backed 7-Minute Workout That Hits All the Muscles You Forget About

Don’t get us wrong—we’re all about bodyweight exercises. And quick, high-intensity routines like the scientific 7-minute workout (plus the research that inspired it) prove you can get in a great workout with very little time and equipment. 

But one issue with relying on body weight as resistance is that it can get a little tricky to work the muscles of your back body—you know, your upper and lower back, glutes, and hamstrings.

“It’s easier to find bodyweight exercises that include squatting and pushing than pulling and hinging,” says Noam Tamir, certified personal trainer and owner of TS Fitness. “These exercises are great; however, they mainly strengthen areas that are already dominant and promote short, tight muscles in the front of the body, leading to poor posture, possible injury, and aesthetic imbalances.” (That’s no bueno.)

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Not to worry. We’ve teamed up with Tamir to create a sister workout for the original 7-minute circuit. This routine is the perfect companion, because each exercise works the opposite muscle groups of the original. “These moves are efficient at keeping the body fit and functioning optimally,” Tamir says. And since you shouldn’t perform HIIT every single day, it’s easy to alternate between the two workouts once or twice a week.  

How to use this list: Perform each exercise in order below at a high-intensity effort for 30 seconds. For single-sided exercises, such as Lateral Squat and Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift, perform the exercise for 15 seconds before switching to the other side. (If you have extra time, perform 30 seconds on each side.) Rest for 5 seconds between each exercise to reset. This circuit can be repeated 2-3 times if desired. All you need is an exercise mat. 

7-Minute Workout: Ice Skater

Ice Skater

Start standing with feet hip-width apart. Hop right leg to the right and swing left leg behind as left arm crosses front of body and right arms swings back. Repeat on other side by reversing the movement with left leg. Continue to hop back and forth (like you’re gliding on ice skates) for 30 seconds. 

7-Minute Workout: Back Widow

Back Push-Up

Lie faceup on mat with knees bent, feet on floor. Bend elbows to 90 degrees with fists toward ceiling (as if you’re holding an imaginary pull-up bar above chest). On the exhale, engage core and press elbows into floor as you squeeze shoulder blades together to lift upper back off the mat. Lead with chest (like a crunch) and keep neck in a neutral position. This should feel like a row, just using body weight (as opposed to cables or weights) for resistance. Inhale and lower back down to starting position. 

7-Minute Workout: Hamstring Curl

Hamstring Curl

Lie facedown on mat. Bend arms and stack hands on top of one another below head to support upper body and maintain a neutral neck. Engage quads and glutes so that lower legs hover above mat. Keeping hips glued down, use backs of legs to slowly bring heels to butt. Resist as you straighten legs back to starting position.  

7-Minute Workout: Shoulder Tap

Shoulder Tap

Start in high plank position, wrists under shoulders, feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Engage core and butt for stability. Tap left hand to right shoulder, then place back on mat. Resist the urge to let hips twist or dip; keep them square to mat. Repeat by tapping right hand to left shoulder and continue to alternate. 

7-Minute Workout: Mountain Climber

Mountain Climber

Start in high plank position, wrists under shoulders, core engaged. Maintaining a straight back, draw right knee to chest, then return to starting position. Repeat with other knee. Continue to alternate legs as fast as possible as if you’re running in place. Keep core tight the entire time to prevent hips dipping or piking.

7-Minute Workout: Superman

Superman

Lie facedown on mat with arms at sides. Inhale, then on the exhale, engage core, back, and glutes to lift upper body and legs up off mat as far as possible. Draw shoulder blades together to engage the upper back muscles and keep neck relaxed by keeping your gaze down. Hold for full exhale, then lower back down on the inhale and repeat.  

7-Minute Workout: Lateral Squat

Lateral Squat

Stand with feet just wider than hip-width apart. Take a big step to the left with left foot as you hinge at hips to send butt back (like a squat). Bend left knee and keep right leg straight. Shift all body weight to the left side as you squat back while keeping chest lifted. Push off with left leg to return to standing, then repeat. 

7-Minute Workout: Bicycle Crunch

Bicycle Crunch

Lie faceup on mat with core engaged so that lower back presses into mat. Lift legs to a tabletop position and lightly touch fingertips to back of ears (this will help you avoid pulling on your neck). Use core to rotate at waist, bringing right elbow to left knee as right leg straightens. Then twist to bring left elbow to right knee as left leg straightens, and continue to alternate. 

7-Minute Workout: Butt Kicker

Butt Kicker

Stand with knees slightly bent. Bring right heel to butt then quickly switch legs to bring left heel to butt. Continue alternating legs while you pump arms (like you’re running in place). Remain on your toes the entire time, landing softly rather than stomping feet to protect your knees. 

7-Minute Workout: Press-Up

Press-Up

Lie facedown on mat with neck neutral, elbows bent to 90 degrees, and hands placed next to ribs. Press through palms to lift upper body up off mat (even hips will come up, but only go as far as lower back will allow). Engage upper back muscles to prevent collapsing into your shoulders. Slowly lower back down and repeat. 

7-Minute Workout: Single Leg Deadlift

Single Leg Romanian Deadlift

Stand with feet together and shift weight to right side to balance on right leg. With a slight bend in standing leg, inhale, then bend at hips to bring upper body and arms forward while left leg shoots back. Keep toes of back leg foot facing the floor and exhale as you return to starting position. 

7-Minute Workout: Down Dog to Plank

Downward Dog to Plank

Start in high plank position. Press floor away as you shift hips back and straight up into downward dog position—you’ll feel a stretch along the backs of your legs and through your upper back. Hold for one count then shift forward back into high plank position and repeat. 

7-Minute Workout
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20 Awesome Things About Being in Your Late 20s

A lot of people think college was the best four years of their life, and others never wanted high school to end. Maybe you can’t wait to hit that age where it makes sense to settle down with a spouse, 2.5 kids, and a house in the suburbs surrounded by a white picket fence.

But your late 20s? Ugh. They’re just an awkward, in-between phase. No one ever talks about how excited they are to turn 28 or 29; there’s even an alleged curse on age 27 because a surprising number of celebrities die at that age.

Well, I’m here to argue that our late 20s get a bad rap. No one ever talks about the good parts. Sure, there are difficulties: trying to build your career; juggling said career, friends, and dating; dating in general. But there are plenty of perks to take advantage of between 25 and 30 that we don’t discuss enough.

1. You have an awesome group of friends.

By now, you’ve established some rock-solid relationships with people who truly get you (and won’t make fun of you for staying in on a Friday night). High school and college throw a lot of randoms together in classes and dorms—who become your friends through default—but now you get to choose people who complement your interests and actually add value to your life.

The author, Locke, cooking in her kitchen.

Cooking with avocado AND red wine—can't beat that combination.

2. You know how to cook more than mac and cheese.

Not that there’s anything wrong with mac and cheese, but expanding your palate and kitchen skills in your 20s will benefit your health and your wallet. You don’t have to know your way around the kitchen like Ina Garten, but it’s nice to know how to whip up a few nice dinners. (Not there yet? Start with one of these incredibly easy and healthy meals anyone can master.)

3. You know what kind of person you want to date…

… and you’ve stopped wasting time on people you know you don’t. There’s merit in dating different types of people, but by the time you hit your late 20s, you’ve—hopefully—realized what qualities are actually important in a significant other (honesty, ambition) and which aren’t (cool car, hot body).

4. You make better life decisions.

So it turns out your brain isn’t even fully formed until after you turn 25. Research indicates that the frontal lobes, which manage impulse control and planning, are the last areas of the brain to develop. (That explains those 3 a.m. Jager bombs.) Now you’re better at making the right choices for the long run rather than the short term.

5. You know what works for your body (and what doesn’t).

You’ve figured out that liquor does make you sicker, so you stick to wine (or vice-versa). You may have also realized that eating a lot of sugar and processed food will make you feel like crap. And that a yoga class or a run feels really damn good.

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6. You know how to take care of your brain too.

Staying mentally healthy is something you (hopefully) don’t have to think about much in your teens or early 20s. But the more life experiences you go through, both good and bad, you understand the damage that stress, anxiety, or depression can do. I’m not saying it’s easy, but learning how to handle whatever is going on in your mind is crucial. (And if you are going through a tough time, here are 81 mental health resources to turn to.)

7. You’re not afraid to ask for what you want.

Something clicked for me after age 26: I realized that it's OK to be assertive. I realized that if you want to be in control of a situation, it’s OK to control it. Speaking up is something especially young women struggle with, although I think the tide is finally changing. Personally, I’ve started to be more vocal about my desires in work, life, and relationships—and damn, does it feel good.

8. You've learned how to say no.

Along those same lines, I’ve also realized that it’s OK to say no. Saying no to something doesn’t mean you’re being rude, lazy, or negative. It simply means you’re choosing to give more time to things that matter in your life than those that don’t—like that second date or third beer.

9. You actually have $ to spend (and save).

By your late 20s, chances are high that you have more disposable income and a few more zeroes in your savings account than you used to. And let’s be real: Getting a raise or a promotion is so much better than good grades in school. Plus, your late 20s are a win-win: You’re still young enough for stores like H&M or Forever21, but you also know it's smart to invest in some nicer clothes that’ll last longer than three washes.

10. Your friends are getting married.

I know, weddings can be crazy expensive (refer to No. 8 if your social schedule is getting out of control). But on the bright side, they’re fantastic excuses to visit some surprisingly beautiful places (looking at you, New Jersey!), hang out with friends and family you don’t see that often, and take advantage of an open bar and free food.

11. You get to play with said friends’ babies.

It’s a totally trippy feeling when your first good friend has their first child, and you realize they’re responsible for raising another human being. But it’s pretty sweet to get your baby fix and hang out with your friend at the same time. Plus it gives you some time to get the hang of it before you decide whether or when to have kids of your own.

The author, Locke, with her parents.

Hanging with my parents… and my friends.

12. You relate to your parents on a different level.

It’s pretty cool how family dynamics change as you get older. My parents and I relate on a different level now that I’m a full-fledged adult and can thoughtfully discuss real-life things like politics or finances. Who knows—maybe they’ll even ask you for advice.

13. You’ve made your house or apartment into a ~home.~

Not saying you have to graduate from IKEA and Target completely, but chances are your house or apartment has some unique, creative touches that aren’t cliche posters of Audrey Hepburn. Hanging out in a comfortable, cozy space you’ve created from scratch (even if you have roommates) is a pretty fantastic feeling.

14. You can appreciate a night out as much as a night in.

This may be my favorite thing about my late 20s. I still love to have the occasional big night out with friends, but I also love staying in with Netflix and popcorn. And I don’t feel bad about doing either. #IDoWhatIWant.

15. You don’t have to prove yourself at work every damn day.

Now that you’ve been working for a few years, you no longer have a resume that lists your high school student council experience. That makes a big difference; people at work have probably grown to respect you and your ideas, and maybe you even manage a team of your own. The responsibilities are bigger, but mentoring someone younger can also be super rewarding (and duh, it's awesome when you can pass off some of your busy work).

16. You can network without feeling like a fraud.

Another work perk of your late 20s: It’s way easier to email people whose work you admire, and they don’t automatically get annoyed by some college kid wanting to "pick their brain." You’re at the point when people are not only willing to meet you, but they’re more than likely interested in your work as well.

17. You’re not (as) addicted to your phone.

If you’re born in the late '80s to early '90s, you’re one of the last (lucky) generations to experience life sans smartphone. Obviously, you’re still on Snapchat, Instagram, and all the other apps of the moment, but you’re also well aware there’s more to life than staring at a screen 24/7. Savor it, folks.

The author, Locke, with her new camera

Playing around with a newly discovered hobby: photography.

18. You get to decide how to spend your free time.

One of my pet peeves is when people say they’re bored. I know it’s so easy to fall into the standard weekend trap of going out, waking up late, working out, hanging out, etc., but there is so much you can do in your spare time: Take a photography class, read, practice yoga, start a side business. Take advantage of it now—all that alone time is going out the window when (if) you have kids.

19. You’re finally OK with just being yourself.

I’m not saying to settle for mediocrity, but at some point in your late 20s, you stop worrying about how you stack up next to other people. You realize that life is no longer a popularity contest (thank God) and that your only real competition is yourself. It’s cheesy, but as long as you’re doing your best, whatever that looks like, you’re doing great.

20. You’ve figured out your values and priorities in life.

By this age, most of us have experienced a tragedy of some sort—whether it’s losing someone close to us, going through a health scare, or dealing with serious family drama. The silver lining? Going through a rough patch will make you reassess your values in life, which is a really important thing to do in your 20s.

Maybe you realized that being close to your family is more important than traveling the world. Maybe you realized that helping others makes you happier than making a lot of money. Maybe you decided you want to be a creative entrepreneur, not a corporate lawyer. Whatever it is, now that you’ve got your priorities straight, you can start planning a life that lines up with them.

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Kayla Itsines Wants You to Stop Feeling Guilty About Taking “Me Time”

Sure, you use #treatyoself when you snap a pic of an indulgent dessert or the bomb outfit you just bought. But when was the last time you had uninterrupted “me time”? That kind of self-care can seem selfish or lazy. But Kayla Itsines, the trainer behind the popular Bikini Body Guides, reminds us in a recent Facebook post that there isn’t anything wrong with taking time for yourself. In fact, the decision to carve out a moment to chill means you’re smart, in control, and taking care of your body. Preach, Kayla!

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This Woman Is Owning (and Wearing) Every Word Someone’s Said About Her Body

When it comes to our bodies, it seems like everyone has something to say. Even when those remarks are “positive,” they can make us feel like crap— especially since we aren’t asking people for their constant judgment. Plus when the comments are negative, they can lead to a lifelong body-image struggle. That’s why Jojo Oldham, a designer from the U.K., decided to do something about all the things people have said about her body over the years.

She took all the phrases—the good, the bad, and the ugly—and painted them onto a white dress. By wearing and owning them, not only does she looks like a total badass, but she also proves that we are way more then what what people say about our bodies:

Photo: Lucy Ridges You’ll notice that there are both nice (“stunning”) and nasty (“porky”) remarks, and that’s part of what makes it so powerful.

jojo oldham dress Photo: Lucy Ridges jojo oldham dress Photo: Lucy Ridges As she explains on her blog, Oldham didn’t make this dress for your pity or to show off the more positive comments. Instead, she’s trying to celebrate the newfound love she has for her body and hopes to inspire others to do the same:

“I’ve reached a point in my life where I finally feel at peace with my body. I still long to be in just one photo wearing a sleeveless top where my upper arms don’t look like giant hams. Or to find a pair of denim shorts that my thighs don’t bulge out of like sausage meat making a desperate escape from the confines of its casing. But I am very happy with my lot. I’m healthy (cross fingers touch wood), strong, and have a body that enables me to do all the things I love (dance, walk, wear tropical print jumpsuits, fling kettlebells around, and sit on my arse watching back to back episodes of The Walking Dead). So what if my upper arms continue waving long after my hand has stopped? Those same upper arms enable me to carry massive boxes all by myself, punch punchbags really hard, and wave my arms in the air like I just don’t care for a really long time.

I respect my body and I look after it. Occasionally I test its limits by trying to cram too much pizza or wine into it, or dancing a bit too enthusiastically, but on the whole we’re good. I’ve stopped treating exercise as a means of bullying my body into fitting into things it’s never going to fit into. Now I exercise in celebration of it, not in battle with it.”

jojo oldham dress Photo: Lucy Ridges Oldham also opens up about her own body-image struggles:

“The urge to delete unflattering photos of myself is overwhelming, even when they represent really happy moments which I never want to forget. I had an absolute blast at my wedding. I felt on top of the world and my husband and I loved every minute. But when I first looked at my photos, my stomach lurched. My eyes skipped past the smiling face, knockout dress and movie star hair and all I could see were chins and bellies. Everywhere. I had a go at myself for not sucking my tummy in more and not learning to smile in a more photogenic way when I’m ecstatically happy. Then I got over it. Turns out that when I’m having the best day ever my chins come out. All three of them. And frankly who can blame them. It was one heck of a party.”

jojo oldham dress Photo: Lucy Ridges Her message is one we can all get on board with— loving your body is not easy, but we all deserve to love the person we are right now:

“I’d rather be the me that isn’t afraid to go out or to eat the cheese or drink the wine or do the running man at wholly inappropriate times, than the me who’s half a stone lighter. And if that means I’m never going to find a pair of denim shorts I feel great in, and that my arms are probably always going to look like giant hams in photos, then I’m good with that. Because we should all be able to celebrate and love ourselves without fear of criticism from others, whatever shape or size we are.”

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